Author Topic: INFORMATIONS ABOUT ALL DISTRICT OF BALOCHISTAN  (Read 5250 times)

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Offline waleed umar rind

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INFORMATIONS ABOUT ALL DISTRICT OF BALOCHISTAN
« on: January 27, 2006, 02:48:21 PM »
SIBI


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Sibi is a town with distinction and great historical importance. It used to be the seat of a number of rulers of area in the olden times.

Sibi is a very ancient town but its origin is shrouded in the dark pages of history. According to local tradition, it derives its name from Sewi, a Hindu Princess of Sewi race, who ruled over the area for a long time before the advent of Islam. It has suffered, owing to its exposed geographical position, from constant sieges, including an assault by the British in the year 1841.

The present town of Sibi was built after the 2nd British invasion of 1878. In its days of British rule, Sibi was known as Sandemanabad. It was named after the name of Captain Sir Robert Sandeman under whose command British troops were sent to repel the internal feuds and external aggressions. The ground where it stands today was at one time Jagir of Chiefs of Baruzai tribe of the area and was called "Baghat4' or garden land.

Sibi has figured prominently in the annals of history due to its position lying on the mouth of Bolan, Mula and Harnai Passes. The towering and intervening hills kept it cut off from the rest of Balochistan and it appeared to have followed the fortunes of Multan and Karachi instead of Khorasan in the north. The area between Bolan Pass and Derajat is marked in the olden maps as Sewistan. According to the local traditions the area was ruled at that time by Hindus known as Sewas. These Sewas are stated to be connected with the Rai dynasty of Sindh. In the history of Alexander's invasions of India, the name of Sibi or Sibia tribe is mentioned. Prior to the advent of the Muslim rule in the area in the seventh century, Sibi seems to have formed part of extensive Hindu Kingdom on the Indus with their capital in Alor.

The first Muslim invasion is said to have been made under Mohammad Bin Qasim, an Arab general of Caliph Walid who took over the place during the reign of Dahir. Sibi formed part of Ghaznavid Empire under Mahmood in the beginning of eleventh century. It was one of the seven Kingdoms of Sindh during the time of Nasiruddin Kabacha.

According to the first proper census taken in 1901 the population of the town stood at 4551 of which 3166 were males and 1385 females. There were about one thousand houses and eighty shops. Its population today has grown considerably. The population of the town shot upto 23 337, males 12,620 and females 10,717 according to 1981 census.

Balochs and Pathans are the two main races which live in this historic town since centuries. Among the Balochs are the tribes of Rind, Jamalis, Khosas, Golas, Umranis and Khiloanis while among the Pathan tribes are Kakars, Pannis Tarins, Sanatia. Spin Tarins, Tor Tarins, Khetrans, Zarkhuns and Bokhari, Syed, Tarans, Chishtis and Ahmaduzai Syeds.

Most important buildings constructed during the British period, are the Residency, the Victoria Memorial Hall, which is presently known as the Jirga Hall built by public subscription in 1903. Government offices and residential quarters for officials, including those of railways, municipal buildings and dispensary, Barness School for Boys and Girls School, Gaisford Library, Ladies Hospital and Victoria Sarai, constructed by Sardar Sohbat Khan Gola, and is known presently after his name and two masjids and two 'dharamshala'. After the creation of Pakistan many more buildings were added to meet the increasing demand of this developing town. Besides other buildings, there is now a full-fledged fully equipped government hospital catering to the requirements of the entire area, another hospital for ladies, a maternity and child welfare centre, a veterinary hospital, a high school each for boys and girls and town committee buildings, and college.

There is also a mutton, fruit and vegetable market and a cinema house as well for recreational purposes and rest houses

Offline waleed umar rind

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INFORMATIONS ABOUT ALL DISTRICT OF BALOCHISTAN
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2006, 02:49:28 PM »
Turbat


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The town is situated on the left bank of Kech stream.It is a market for dates. The dates of Turbat compare well with Basra dates. A date processing factory has been set up at Turbat. The main buildings are the palace of the Nawab of Makran, the Nazim's Mosque and the Turbat Rest House. Punnu, the hero of the romance of Sassi Punnu, belonged to Turbat. The remains of Punnu s fort can still be seen at Turbat. The traditions of the Fikri faith cluster round Turbat Places sacred to the sect include Shirin Kurm stream. Koh-e-Murad and Barre Kabur.

Offline waleed umar rind

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INFORMATIONS ABOUT ALL DISTRICT OF BALOCHISTAN
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2006, 02:50:14 PM »
Gawader


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Gwadur is one of the most important coastal towns of Pakistan besides being the biggest fishing centre in the entire coastal belt of Balochistan the coastline is peculiar in that it has its own characteristics different from the rest of the Province and Gwadar.

The most novel development one can associate with Gwadar is the unusual movement of its population over the past few decades. While the world is beset with the prospects of population explosion, Gwadar faces the problem of ever decreasing number of its inhabitants.

Gwadar remained under the Ruler of Oman for several decades. It only became a part of Pakistan after the transfer of its territorial sovereignty during late fifties. Till that time Gwadar was under the ruler of Sultanate of Oman a British Protectorate.

At present Gwadar continues to be one of the main centres of human activities in Balochistan where socio-cultural programmes are organised. Because of its closer affinity with the Gulf and increased traffic between the Gulf and Pakistan, Gwadar was upgraded as an international airport in 1970, connecting Muscat and Karachi.

PIA started operating a DC-3 service in 1965. Fokker service was introduced in 1966 after the runway was metalled.Gwadar presently handles 20 flights per week of which four are international. The international flights are opterated both by PIA and Gulf airlines.

Historically, Gwadar is one place that attracted the attention of the Arabian Peninsular countries for centuries and also Portugal. In fact once Portuguese sea pirates invaded Gwadar and Pasni.

Offline waleed umar rind

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INFORMATIONS ABOUT ALL DISTRICT OF BALOCHISTAN
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2006, 02:51:07 PM »
Khuzdar


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It is a district and divisional headquarter town in Balochistan. It is at the apex of a narrow valley at an elevation of 4.000 feet. The climate is good with plenty of water. The town is surrounded by orchards. During the Arab rule this region formed the province of Turan and Khuzdar was the capital. It was an important cantonment and was the headquarter of the Arab General Commanding the Indian frontier. Later Khuzdar became a part of the Kalat State. It was the scene of a battle between the people of Jhalawan and the Khan of Kalat in 1869. The Khan of Kalat Mir Khuda Khan was victorious and built here a fort of painted pottery. Close to the town are the ruins of an old fort built by the Arabs

Offline waleed umar rind

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INFORMATIONS ABOUT ALL DISTRICT OF BALOCHISTAN
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2006, 02:51:42 PM »
Chagai


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It is 32 miles north east of Dalbandin on the Quetta-Zahidan railway. The name is attributed to the number of wells which existed here previously. There is a mud fort where Amir Abdul Rehman of Kabul took refuge in 1869 after his defeat in Afghanistan. Close to Chagai is the shrine of Syed Bala Nosh.

Offline waleed umar rind

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INFORMATIONS ABOUT ALL DISTRICT OF BALOCHISTAN
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2006, 02:52:18 PM »
Loralai


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It is 94 km (59 miles) from Ziarat to Loralai on a poorly surfaced road. You pass through attractive little villages surrounded by compact orchards the purple and black mountains looming behind. It is known for its good almonds and pomegranates .The drive from Quetta to I Loralai takes about five hours.

Fort Munro
From Loralai to Fort Munro at the foot of the Sulaiman mountain range is 200 kms (124 miles) of partially surfaced road. It is called the Robber Road. It is barren and rubble-strewn but dramatically beautiful because of the fantastic contours formed by erosion. Fort Munro is just beyond the Punjab border. The term 'fort' seems somewhat exaggerated since the town looks more like a peaceful hill resort with gardens and orchards rather than a military outpost. The town was founded by Sir Robert Sandeman and named after Colonel Munro who was commissioner of the Derajat Division.

Khojak Tunnel
The Khojak tunnel is in the historic pass across the Khawaja Amran offshoot of the Toba- Kakar mountains in the Quetta- Pishin district. The pass is 70 miles from Quetta by rail on the Quetta Chaman railway. The crest is reached at Shelabagh railway station 6.396 feet above sea level.

Beyond Shelabagh the railway runs through to Khojak tunnel which is 24/z miles long. It was constructed in 1891 and is the largest railway tunnel in the Indo-Pakistan sub- continent.

Offline waleed umar rind

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INFORMATIONS ABOUT ALL DISTRICT OF BALOCHISTAN
« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2006, 02:53:04 PM »
Ziarat


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Khilafat Hills are the highest peak with an altitude of 11.400 feet The route is comparatively more difficult.

Chautar Valley
About 8 miles from Ziarat is the beautiful Chautar Valley. There are green picnic spots in the interior of the valley where one can get away from it all. There is also a rest house in case one wants to stay longer. The crude and rustic huts made with the bark of juniper trees, in which the inhabitants of the area live are strikingly different from dwellings in other villages.

Feru Tangi
6 Miles by jeep from Ziarat, off the main road to Quetta lies Feru Tangi or gorge. There is a small water fall as the mountain springs flow down. It is a 2 mile walk from the main road to this soot which is ideal for picnics.

Ziarat
No visit to Quetta is complete without a trip to Ziarat Break the routine holiday in the delightfully cool city. Situated 76 miles from Quetta at an altitude of 8.400 feet above sea-level, Ziarat is a holiday resort amidst one of the largest and oldest juniper forests in the world.

The juniper's soft whispering and bird songs are about the only sound that breaks the prevailing stillness. You will enjoy Ziarat's picturesque walks, views lush picnic spots and pure health giving water from an interesting natural spring.

Ziarat's attractions are many. For the naturalist hiker there are walks amidst picturesque surroundings. For the hunter, games on foothills, for the mountaineer, challenging heights presenting panoramic picture of the whole of Ziarat. And for a religious minded, a pilgrimage to the Shrine of Kharwari Baba popularly known as Ziarat Baba Mian Abdul Hakim at Goshki, a hill top near here.

The health forming spring water, the refreshing mountain and the conferous junipers have made Ziarat a hill station for many years. The legend is that Baba Kharwari, a famous saint, while on a preaching mission was looking for a place for giving some rest to his tired feet. When he reached the place now known as Ziarat, he climbed a hill top, and uttered. "This land shall flourish" with the saying he tapped the ground with his wand.

The saint opposed the tyranny and high handedness of the Gilkai King Hussain and was compelled to migrate from Kandhar in Afghanistan to this place of rest. The shrine is surrounded by beautiful scenery after his death he was buried here. Out came the water from that spot which is still flourishing and is regarded as holy and wholesome. People visit his shrine, which is in the centre of the valley and is 31/2 miles by jeep from Ziarat.

Offline waleed umar rind

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INFORMATIONS ABOUT ALL DISTRICT OF BALOCHISTAN
« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2006, 02:54:28 PM »
Makran
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Makran is the remotest south west administrative division of the Province of Balochistan and Pakistan Its population, as per 1981 census, was 652,602 over an area of about 24.000 sq. miles. It is bounded on north and east by Kalat Division, on the west by Iran with a common border of about 320 kms and on the south by Arabian Sea. The coast line of Makran is about 400 Kms long, which has geostrategic significance due to its proximity with the straits of Hormuz.The Arabian Sea off the Makran coast abounds in fish, shrimps in particular. Fishing is the major occupation of the coastal people or "Makranis". The name Makran comes from the Farsi Mahi Khoran (fish eaters), Retreating through Makran in 325 BC the Greeks also called them Icthyophagi (the eaters of fish).

There are three main mountain ranges. Traversing from east to west is the Mekran Coast Range (upto 200 feet above sea level), proceeding northward, the next range, occupying the centre of the division is the central Mekran Range (500 feet to 10,000 feet high), while in the north separating Mekran from Kalat Division, is the Siahan Range (its elevation varies rom 3,000 feet on the east to 4,500 feet on the north east)

Offline waleed umar rind

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INFORMATIONS ABOUT ALL DISTRICT OF BALOCHISTAN
« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2006, 02:55:27 PM »
Zohb Valley


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Barren hills of rmulti-coloured rocks hide one of the most beautiful and spectacular valleys of Pakistan Situated some 60 miles north-east of Quetta, Zhob Valley is not much known despite its beauty and the ancient culture that once flourished here.

The original name of the town was 'Apazai '. During the British period it was named Fort Sandeman after Sir Robert Sandeman. It has now been renamed as Zhob.

This 200 miles long and on an average 15 miles wide Valley is probably nature's biggest gift to Pakistan. Starting at Kan Mebtarzai which is 7.500 feet above sea level 60 miles from Quetta. Zhob Valley continues through Muslim Bagh. Qilla Salfullah and Fort Sandeman to Afghanistan border.

Being not less than 4,500 feet above sea level at any point and surrounded by hills, which are over 10,000 feet high. This Valley can boast of some of the loveliest spots, unspoiled by human hands. One can enjoy a snowfall or a very bracing winter or a cool summer in this Valley. The Valley abounds in fruits: the nicest peaches, apples, grapes, apricots, pomegranates, plums, almonds, walnuts and melons.

For wild flower collectors, the Zhob Valley is a paradise. Wild lovely flowers bloom from February to May. especially lavender, tulips, hyacinths, poppies, iris ephedra and others.

The Zhob Valley was located or, the ancient caravan routes to Afghanistan and in this fertile valley once lived perhaps the earliest agricultural communities known in the Indo-Pak subcontinent Very little reconstruction work has been done on the Zhob Valley civilization, but there is no doubt that it was flourishing at the beginning of 3,000 B.C. The baked earthen ware and figurines discovered at various sites like Rana Gundai. Sur Jungle, Perian Gundai, Mughal Gundai and Kandai suggest affinities of this culture with that of the Bronze Age culture of the regions further west.

The resemblance of the Zhob Valley pottery with that discovered at various cities in the Indus Valley also suggest links with these cultures. Also, the grey-ware bowls found in - the Zhob Valley sites are similar to a group of early pottery from sites in the Fars province of Iran.

The climate of Zhob Valley is very healthy, winter is a bit long and severe but spring and autumn are beautiful. In some winters, Kan Mehtarzai and Muslim Bagh experience several feet of snow, though normal temperature is about 19-50 °F But in summer the maximum temperature shoots to about 100 °F but due to very dry climate it is not uncomfortable and evenings are invariably cool. Scorpions are abundant here. The best months to visit this area are February to March when one can see snow and spring together. April when wild flowers bloom and August to October when there is an abundance of fruits and the weather is pleasant.

In Muslim Bagh, Qilla Saifullah and Fort Sandeman, there are number of Dak Bungalows and rest houses to stay. Accommodation can be arranged with the Political Agent or Executive Engineer, P.W.D., at Fort Sandeman or the sub-Divisional Magistrate at Muslim Bagh.

Various tribes of Kakar pathans inhabit the Valley. Medium statured and well built these handsome people are mostly wheat complexioned but some of them are really fair and have blue eyes. Though in touch with the outside world for a long time they have retained their age-old traditions and are proud of them. Even now, a bridegroom cannot take the bride away to his house till his party has defeated the bride s party at marksmanship. Their hospitality is well known and the coming of a guest is always considered a blessing.

Some people still lead a nomadic life and are on the road for the greater part of the year. The migration to the plains start from October and some caravans go as far as Multan or Hyderabad with sheep, camels and donkeys. It is common to see small babies and newly born lambs tied together in nets on camel backs. These caravans return to their native land in March or early April.

Due to extreme severe winter food has to be stocked and the common practice is to slaughter a few specially fattened sheep and dry their meat by hanging it on poles. This salted and dried meat called Landhi, is considered a local delicacy. Another popular dish is Shorba, a thin meat soup in wooden basins in which pieces of bread are soaked. This is eaten from the basin itself five to six persons sharing each basin. Barbecued lamb, rice with boiled meat, meat curries with only salt and pepper are the common dishes. Green tea is the favourite drink.

Most of the work is usually done by women, who work a great deal in the field as well. Water being scarce it has sometimes to be brought from long distances usually by little girls or the female members of the family.

The common dress of men is Shalwar, Shirt and long coat while women wear flowing frocks which touch the ground. They wrap themselves up in red shawls and very seldom can one see a woman not dressed in red. This is a legacy of the past when various tribes spent their time is shooting at each other. Since women did not take part in shooting they dressed themselves in red so that they were not shot at by mistake. Women wear silver jewelry and waistcoats or dresses with small mirrors are worn on festive occasions. Women also like to have their hand and faces tattooed in various designs. Henna is extensively used by women as well as men, not only on their beards but also on hands and feet. On festive occasions, gay coloured clothes are worn by men and women alike.

There are a number of places of interest for a tourist in the Zhob Valley. The archaeological sites of Rana Gundai, Sur Jungle. Mughai Gundai and others, etc. neglected and unknown as they are can still be visited.

Offline Nadir Shah

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Re: INFORMATIONS ABOUT ALL DISTRICT OF BALOCHISTAN
« Reply #9 on: August 05, 2006, 12:23:07 PM »
Awaran (Urdu: آواران)
Awaran district is in the center of Balochistan province of Pakistan. The district consists of three tehsils, i.e., Mashkai, Awaran, Jhal Jhao; eight patwar circles – Jairi, Gajar, Parwar, Peelar Jah, Awaran, Gashkore, Peelar Jhao and Camp Jhao; and 216 mauzas (villages). Over 98% of the people of the area are Muslims. There is a small Zikri minority. The population of Awaran is estimated to be over 200,000 in 2005. Awaran has witnessed a steady rise in population. The whole population has always been rural. The tribes in Awaran are divided into several clans. The Baloch tribes in the district are Bizenjo, Mohammed Hasni, Sajdi, Mirwani, Rakhshani,Qambrani, Musiani, Sumalani and Mengal.