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Offline Mir Javed Baloch

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THE GULISTAN OF SA'DI
« on: October 30, 2007, 11:57:08 PM »
                         THE GULISTAN OF SA'DI
                 by Sheikh Muslih-uddin Sa'di Shirazi (1258)
                       Translated by Sir Edwin Arnold
                                    (1899)

The Sheikh saadi was greet poet of Farsi , he wrote many books but the famous book of this poet are "Gulistan" and "Bostan", In these book with small stories he convey big msges. These both books are translated into many other languages and include as a course book. gulistan was first book which have both form Descriptive and poetic.
Sheikh Saadi traveled in many countries and the given stories are findings of that .
This book is divided into 8 diffrent chapters
           I The Manners of Kings
          II On the Morals of Dervishes
         III On the Excellence of Content
          IV On the Advantages of Silence
           V On Love and Youth
          VI On Weakness and Old Age
         VII On the Effects of Education
        VIII On Rules for Conduct in Life
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Offline Mir Javed Baloch

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Re: THE GULISTAN OF SA'DI
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2007, 12:05:03 AM »
CHAPTER I
                      THE MANNERS OF KINGS

                             Story 1

  I heard a padshah giving orders to kill a prisoner. The helpless
fellow began to insult the king on that occasion of despair, with
the tongue he had, and to use foul expressions according to the
saying:

        Who washes his hands of life
        Says whatever he has in his heart.

  When a man is in despair his tongue becomes long and he is like a
vanquished cat assailing a dog.

        In time of need, when flight is no more possible,
        The hand grasps the point of the sharp sword.

  When the king asked what he was saying, a good-natured vezier
replied: 'My lord, he says: Those who bridle their anger and forgive
men; for Allah loveth the beneficent.'
  The king, moved with pity, forbore taking his life but another
vezier, the antagonist of the former, said: 'Men of our rank ought
to speak nothing but the truth in the presence of padshahs. This
fellow has insulted the king and spoken unbecomingly.'
The king, being displeased with these words, said: 'That lie was more acceptable to me
than this truth thou hast uttered because the former proceeded from
a conciliatory disposition and the latter from malignity; and wise men
have said: "A falsehood resulting in conciliation is better than a
truth producing trouble."'

        He whom the shah follows in what he says,
        It is a pity if he speaks anything but what is good.

  The following inscription was upon the portico of the hall of
Feridun:

        O brother, the world remains with no one.
        Bind the heart to the Creator, it is enough.
        Rely not upon possessions and this world
        Because it has cherished many like thee and slain them.
        When the pure soul is about to depart,
        What boots it if one dies on a throne or on the ground?
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Offline Zahida Raees Raji

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Re: THE GULISTAN OF SA'DI
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2007, 10:53:16 AM »
Thanks brother for this wounderful sharing.
I'd be glad if one could share translation of Molana Romi's Masnavi.
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Offline Mir Javed Baloch

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Re: THE GULISTAN OF SA'DI
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2007, 10:58:21 PM »
Minat Waar Gwaar Raji
Sheik Saadi ie kitaab Gulistaan chun kay Rum(nasr,verse)ao shairy dohenanien taha inth, wanook bulkien kamo pareshan beban,  awanie asanie wastha man gushan kay Rum walla hisa(portion) cha baad kay do lananie(line),charr lananie ya geshter lananie taha kay chez likithagan  balay cha ie degar laana(line) che kamo gistha likitagan bezaan kay shairy taha anth.
minat waar.
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Offline Mir Javed Baloch

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Re: THE GULISTAN OF SA'DI
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2007, 11:12:48 PM »
Story 2
I have heard that a royal prince of short stature and mean presence,
whose brothers were tall and good-looking, once saw his father
glancing on him with aversion and contempt but he had the shrewdness
and penetration to guess the meaning and said: 'O father, a puny
intelligent fellow is better than a tall ignorant man, neither is
everything bigger in stature higher in price. A sheep is nice to eat
and an elephant is carrion.'

      The smallest mountain on earth is Jur(Kohay Toor); nevertheless
      It is great with Allah in dignity and station.

               Hast thou not heard that a lean scholar
               One day said to a fat fool:
               'Although an Arab horse may be weak
               It is thus more worth than a stable full of asses.'

The father laughed at this sally, the pillars of the state approved of it, but the brothers felt much aggrieved.

        While a man says not a word
        His fault and virtue are concealed.
        Think not that every desert is empty.
        Possibly it may contain a sleeping tiger.

I heard that on the said occasion the king was menaced by a powerful enemy and that when the two armies were about to encounter each other,the first who entered the battlefield was the little fellow who said:

      'I am not he whose back thou wilt see on the day of battle
      But he whom thou shalt behold in dust and blood.
      Who himself fights, stakes his own life
      In battle but he who flees, the blood of his army.'

After uttering these words he rushed among the troops of the enemy, slew several warriors and, returning to his father, made humble obeisance and said:

        'O thou, to whom my person appeared contemptible,
        Didst not believe in the impetuosity of my valour.
        A horse with slender girth is of use
        On the day of battle, not a fattened ox.'

It is related that the troops of the enemy were numerous, and that the king's, being few, were about to flee, but that the puny youth raised a shout, saying: 'O men, take care not to put on the garments of women.' These words augmented the rage of the troopers so that they made a unanimous attack and I heard that they gained the victory on the said occasion. The king kissed the head and eyes of his son, took him in his arms and daily augmented his affection till he appointed him to succeed him on the throne. His brothers became envious and placed poison in his food but were perceived by his sister from her apartment, whereon she closed the window violently and the youth, shrewdly guessing the significance of the act, restrained his hands from touching the food, and said: 'It is impossible that men of honour should die, and those who possess none should take their place.'

        No one goes under the shadow of an owl
        Even if the homa(a imigenary bird,Mark of good fate) should disappear from the world.

  This state of affairs having been brought to the notice of the father, he severely reproved the brothers and assigned to each of them a different, but pleasant, district as a place of exile till the confusion was quelled and the quarrel appeased; and it has been said that ten dervishes may sleep under the same blanket but that one country cannot hold two padshahs.

        When a pious man eats half a loaf of bread
        He bestows the other half upon dervishes.
        If a padshah were to conquer the seven climates
        He would still in the same way covet another.

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Offline Mir Javed Baloch

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Re: THE GULISTAN OF SA'DI
« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2007, 01:16:57 AM »
Banok Raji
Mani kirra Maulana Room ie urdu translation asthien balay a picture format toka an to mana bugu yak picture aragay wastha man chuun bikien.tae baaz baaz minat waar ban
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Offline Zahida Raees Raji

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Re: THE GULISTAN OF SA'DI
« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2007, 08:11:46 PM »
Banok Raji
Mani kirra Maulana Room ie urdu translation asthien balay a picture format toka an to mana bugu yak picture aragay wastha man chuun bikien.tae baaz baaz minat waar ban

taee kirrah File attach kanage facility hasten' tao aahiye tavassuta chey image files upload kot kane.
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Offline Mir Javed Baloch

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Re: THE GULISTAN OF SA'DI
« Reply #7 on: November 02, 2007, 01:23:03 AM »
                                    Story 4

A band of Arab brigands having taken up their position on the top of a mountain and closed the passage of caravans, the inhabitants of the country were distressed by their stratagems and the troops of the sultan foiled because the robbers, having obtained an inaccessible spot on the summit of the mountain, thus had a refuge which they made their habitation. The chiefs of that region held a consultation about getting rid of the calamity because it would be impossible to offer resistance to the robbers if they were allowed to remain.

        A tree which has just taken root
        May be moved from the place by the strength of a man
        But, if thou leavest it thus for a long time,
        Thou canst not uproot it with a windlass.
        The source of a fountain may be stopped with a bodkin
        But, when it is full, it cannot be crossed on an elephant.

 The conclusion was arrived at to send one man as a spy and to wait for the opportunity till the brigands departed to attack some people and leave the place empty. Then several experienced men, who had fought in battles, were despatched to keep themselves in ambush in a hollow of the mountain. In the evening the brigands returned from their excursion with their booty, divested themselves of their arms,put away their plunder and the first enemy who attacked them was sleep, till about a watch of the night had elapsed:

        The disk of the sun went into darkness.
        Jonah went into the mouth of the fish.

 The warriors leapt forth from the ambush, tied the hands of every one of the robbers to his shoulders and brought them in the morning to the court of the king, who ordered all of them to be slain. There happened to be a youth among them, the fruit of whose vigour was just ripening and the verdure on the rose-garden of whose cheek had begun to sprout. One of the veziers, having kissed the foot of the king's throne and placed the face of intercession upon the ground, said: 'This boy has not yet eaten any fruit from the garden of life
and has not yet enjoyed the pleasures of youth. I hope your majesty will generously and kindly confer an obligation upon your slave by sparing his life.' The king, being displeased with this request, answered:

      'He whose foundation is bad will not take instruction from the good,
      To educate unworthy persons is like throwing nuts on a cupola.

'It is preferable to extirpate the race and offspring of these people and better to dig up their roots and foundations, because it is not the part of wise men to extinguish fire and to leave burning coals or to kill a viper and leave its young ones.

        If a cloud should rain the water of life
        Never sip it from the branch of a willow-tree.
        Associate not with a base fellow
        Because thou canst not eat sugar from a mat-reed.'

The vezier heard these sentiments, approved of them nolens volens,praised the opinion of the king and said: 'What my lord has uttered is the very truth itself because if the boy had been brought up in the company of those wicked men, he would have become one of themselves.But your slave hopes that he will, in the society of pious men, profit by education and will acquire the disposition of wise persons. Being yet a child the rebellious and perverse temper of that band has not yet taken hold of his nature and there is a tradition of the prophet
that every infant is born with an inclination for Islam but his parents make him a Jew, a Christian or a Majusi.'

        The spouse of Lot became a friend of wicked persons.
        His race of prophets became extinct.
        The dog of the companions of the cave for some days
        Associated with good people and became a man.

When the vezier had said these words and some of the king's courtiers had added their intercession to his, the king no longer desired to shed the blood of the youth and said: 'I grant the request although I disapprove-of it.'

        Knowest thou not what Zal said to the hero Rastam:
        'An enemy cannot be held despicable or helpless.
        I have seen many a water from a paltry spring
        Becoming great and carrying off a camel with its load.'

In short, the vezier brought up the boy delicately, with every comfort, and kept masters to educate him, till they had taught him to address persons in elegant language as well as to reply and he had acquired every accomplishment. One day the vezier hinted at his talents in the presence of the king, asserting that the instructions of wise men had taken effect upon the boy and had expelled his
previous ignorance from his nature. The king smiled at these words and
said:

        'At last a wolf's whelp will be a wolf
        Although he may grow up with a man.'

After two years had elapsed a band of robbers in the locality joined him, tied the knot of friendship and, when the opportunity presented itself, he killed the vezier with his son, took away untold wealth and succeeded to the position of his own father in the robber-cave where he established himself. The king, informed of the event, took the finger of amazement between his teeth and said:

     'How can a man fabricate a good sword of bad iron?
     O sage, who is nobody becomes not somebody by education.
     The rain, in the beneficence of whose nature there is no flaw,
     Will cause tulips to grow in a garden and weeds in bad soil.
     Saline earth will not produce hyacinths.
     Throw not away thy seeds or work thereon.
     To do good to wicked persons is like Doing evil to good men.'

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