Author Topic: Help for Emails  (Read 2944 times)

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Offline Perozai R!nd

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Help for Emails
« on: April 13, 2006, 11:27:47 AM »
How to Write HTML links in E-Mail
SUMMARY: Write web addresses in e-mail messages that can be clicked.

When writing e-mail that involves telling someone about a webpage, it is recommended to write the complete URL, including the http:// prefix, instead of just writing the last part of the URL.

For example, instead of writing www.envprogramming.com in an e-mail message, write http://www.envprogramming.com

Why?

Many e-mail programs will 'render' such text as a link, letting people quickly and easily click on the link in the e-mail message to view your suggested site. Chances are, more e-mail programs will recognize addresses starting with the http:// prefix than those which do not.


Offline Perozai R!nd

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Re: Help for Emails
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2006, 11:28:25 AM »
Always Scan E-Mail File Attachments
SUMMARY: Better safe than sorry - scan all e-mail attachments first!

If your E-Mail program accepts file attachments, take care before opening them and viewing the attachment contents. While some file attachments are just webpages or external text files, some are programs - and some may contain viruses. Especially when receiving file attachments from unknown sources, be sure to virus scan the attachments before viewing their contents. Better safe than sorry.


Offline Perozai R!nd

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Re: Help for Emails
« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2006, 11:28:58 AM »
Think That Attachment is From Your Friend?
SUMMARY: Be VERY careful about electronic mail attachments - even if the sender seems to be a friend or family member! You need to read this tip.

Did a friend or family member just send you an electronic mail attachment that you weren't expecting? Surely your co-worker checked the file out first? Of course your mom would not send you something that would harm your computer, right?

Nowadays, you MUST be safe. Why not ask your friend or family member in a friendly e-mail if they really meant to send you the attachment?

Why am I saying this? It's not to upset dear ma. But, thanks to the newest viruses that spread through email, many peoples' computers are becoming unwitting accomplices to the spread of rogue software. There are viruses that can affect peoples' machines, causing them to e-mail innocent looking attachments that are actually viruses to everyone in their address box. Worse yet, some of these viruses actually can make the e-mail look like it came from someone else!

That's right. For example, say you have a friend, Bob, who uses e-mail software that contains an address book. Let's say that your name is in Bob's address book, but so is that of a mutual friend, Bill. Unfortunately, there are viruses that cause e-mail to be sent to you that are made to look like the e-mail came from Bill!

A virus may have actually sent the attachment that SEEMS to be sent by your friend or family member.

When it comes to e-mail attachments, be safe. Scan EVERY attachment, no matter who sent it, and don't open an attachment unless you're sure it is safe and the sender meant to mail you the file.


Offline Perozai R!nd

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Re: Help for Emails
« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2006, 11:29:26 AM »
Free Greeting Cards
SUMMARY: Send a greeting without paying for a stamp.

Want to dash off a quick birthday greeting, a friendly hello, or a wish for holiday cheer, but don't feel like writing up a message and using a stamp? There are many sites on the Internet that let you send free greeting cards via email. Most of them work this way:

1) You sign up for the free service.
2) Select the type of card, graphic, audio, etc.
3) Enter your greeting and your recipient's name and address.
4) Your recipient gets an email stating they have the card.
5) Your recipient visits the greeting card website mentioned in the email, types in a special card number, and views the card.

One downside is that many of these services will send promotional information to your electronic mail box. Some services let you opt out of this service; others may not stop sending email unless you quit using their services. It's best to research your options and carefully read sites' user agreements.

Here are a few sites that as of this writing provide free greeting cards on the Internet. These are listed for informational purposes only.

http://www.free-e-cards-online.com/ - Free E-Cards Online

http://www.freewebcards.com/ - Free Web Cards

http://www.greetingsdepot.com/ - Greetings Depot

http://www.hicards.com/ - HiCards

http://www.usagreetings.com/ - USA Greetings

http://www.wegotcards.com/ - We Got Cards


Offline Perozai R!nd

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Re: Help for Emails
« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2006, 11:30:00 AM »
Never Send Passwords Via Email!
SUMMARY: Why sending passwords by email is a huge security risk.

If you are ever asked in an electronic mail message to send a password by e-mail, never, NEVER, NEVER do so! It doesn't matter if the electronic mail message looks official, as the 'from' address in an electronic mail message can be forged. It doesn't matter if the e-mail claims to be from an administrator of the online service you are using. Don't respond directly to the e-mail!

1) Electronic mail is not safe and secure. E-mail is unencrypted, meaning that messages can sometimes be intercepted between you and the destination and read.

2) More than likely, the organization claiming to ask for your password isn't really the person asking for such information! If you provide your password to just anyone, then a stranger can login to your service as you and cause all kinds of trouble! For example, America Online constantly reminds its users that they will never ask for password or account information by e-mail. Even so, every day people receive spam claiming to be from AOL stating that due to computer failure, they must re-enter their password or respond to an e-mail asking for a password. DON'T!

You have to be careful on the Internet. Never provide private information by e-mail, and certainly never send any passwords using e-mail, especially to someone claiming to be a higher-up at your ISP or another company.


Offline Perozai R!nd

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Re: Help for Emails
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2006, 11:30:24 AM »
Avoid One-Word Subjects
SUMMARY: E-mail with brief subjects may not get read.

If you want your electronic mail messages to be read by their intended recipients, you should consider creating subject lines that are more descriptive than just "Hello", "Hi", or "Info". Busy individuals scan through large numbers of emails daily, and they may see such subject lines and decide to skip your message. Also, many spam and virus-created e-mail messages use short, one-word subjects, and aggressive spam filters may automatically flag such messages as junk. Thus, your messages may never reach their recipients.


Offline Perozai R!nd

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Re: Help for Emails
« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2006, 11:30:53 AM »
Can My Boss Read My Mail?
SUMMARY: Be careful what you write in e-mail from your office.

The short answer is yes if you are using your company's electronic mail server.

Many companies now have acceptable use standards for email. These tend to include lines such as "The Company has the right to read any electronic mail passed through the system." This does not necessarily mean that your boss is personally going to snoop and look at every message sent, but it means they have the right to do so. Most of the time, mail is scanned to ensure harassing or harmful material is not passed through the system, viruses don't get sent, pyramid schemes are not started at work, etc., but there are other reasons mail may be read.

Just because you delete a message on your system does not mean it is gone forever! Backups of email messages can and sometimes are automatically made on the server level for legal reasons.

So, play it safe. Don't send any mail at work you wouldn't want others to see.


Offline Perozai R!nd

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Re: Help for Emails
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2006, 11:31:25 AM »
Official-Looking Emails May Be Scams
SUMMARY: Avoid getting caught by a phishing e-mail scam.

Be very careful if you receive an electronic mail message asking for personal information such as your credit card number and expiration date, driver's license number, social-security number, or password to an online service. Sometimes, official-looking email may seem to come from PayPal, eBay, Amazon, or your credit card company, and claim that due to a problem with your account, you need to re-enter some information on your site.

If you get these types of emails, be very cautious before clicking on the link in the e-mail and providing such information! If so, you might become the victim of what is called a phishing scam.

Many times such emails will provide links that supposedly go to the site claiming to ask for such details, but the links actually go elsewhere to scam sites. These sites can be made up to look exactly like an official-looking website, yet if you enter your personal information, you will most likely become the victim of identity theft. Credit cards numbers often are stolen this way and used by unscrupulous individuals.

If you ever receive e-mail asking for such information, either:

a) Ignore it if the e-mail comes from a company in which you have not previously done business, or

b) Contact the site in question. Type in the company's URL directly in your web browser and DO NOT use the link provided in the e-mail! Call the site's operator or leave them an e-mail using the site's official "contact us" or "feedback" link asking them if they indeed need you to provide information related to your account. More than likely the operator will say 'no' and state that you received a scam e-mail in your inbox.

Play it safe on the Internet and avoid phishing e-mails. Just because you get an e-mail from someone does not mean the e-mail actually came from the alleged individual or company. The e-mail 'from' address can be forged. Web links in electronic mail messages can be forged. If someone asks for private information via e-mail, go directly to the originating site by typing the URL in your browser and ask if they need account information, and why.


Offline Perozai R!nd

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Re: Help for Emails
« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2006, 11:32:01 AM »
Remember, E-Mail Can Be Permanent
SUMMARY: E-mail you send can have a very, very long shelf life.

When you send an electronic mail message to your recipient, as soon as your recipient receives the message, they will respond. Then they will probably delete the message. Then it is gone. Right?

Wrong!

Although you may think electronic mail messages as temporary notes between one person to another, there are many reasons why you should always consider what you write before you send it. Electronic mail message can survive a long, long time, for the following reasons, among others:

1) In most e-mail software, just because someone deletes a message doesn't mean the e-mail is gone. E-mail may remain in a trashcan until it is permanently deleted, and some people may never permanently delete their e-mail, meaning it could be accessible years from the time it was written!

2) E-mail servers at your ISP (Internet Service Provider), company, or your recipient's ISP or company may keep copies of your mail message. While many such servers used to delete old mail after a certain period of time to save disk space, two things are changing this at many places. One, disk space is getting a whole lot cheaper. And second, due to recent accounting rules, some companies are NEVER allowed to delete e-mail, meaning your message may stay around backed up on tape virtually forever!


Offline Perozai R!nd

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Re: Help for Emails
« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2006, 11:32:39 AM »
What Country is That Sender From?
SUMMARY: Help determine an e-mail's country of origin.

Have you ever received an e-mail where the sender's address didn't end in .com, .edu, or .org, but instead .ie, .pl, or .vi? These abbreviations are called Top Level Domain codes, and they can signify the country of a user sending an e-mail message.

Sample Country TLD codes:

.cn - China
.de - Germany
.fr - France
.ie - Ireland
.jp - Japan
.us - United States
.uk - United Kingdom

For a complete list of country TLD codes, visit this page from IANA (Internet Assigned Numbers Authority):

TLD Codes: http://www.iana.org/cctld/cctld-whois.htm

Remember though - e-mail addresses can be forged. If you receive spam from an e-mail address ending with one of these TLD codes, the e-mail may not actually have originated in said country


Offline زینوک Zenok

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Re: Help for Emails
« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2006, 11:43:00 AM »
 :friends:  Very usefull information. Thanx for sharing.
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