Author Topic: Mir Jalal Khan  (Read 1197 times)

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Offline rindolashar

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Mir Jalal Khan
« on: August 05, 2012, 05:18:24 AM »
 bismillah

Mir Jalal Khan, son of Jiand, was the ruler and founder of the Baloch Kingdom in the 13 century. He had 2 Brothers, Mir Ali or Aali and Mir Nos.

He left four sons, Rind, Lashar, Hot, and Korai, and a daughter Jatoi, who married his nephew Murad. These five are the eponymous founders of the five great divisions of the tribe, the Rinds, Lasharis, Hooths, Korais, and Jatois.

There are, however, some tribes that cannot be brought within these divisions, and accordingly some genealogies provide ancestors for them. Two more sons were added to the list—Ali and Bulo. From Bulo are descended the Buledhis, and from Ali’s two sons, Ghazan and Umar, are derived the Ghazani Marris and the Umaranis (now scattered among several tribes). The genealogies given in the ‘Tuhfatu’l-Kiram 1 seem to be apocryphal, and are not in accordance with Baloch.
Jalálu’d-din was allegedly one of fifty brothers, and that, while the descendants of the other brothers mingled with the people of Makran, those of Jalalu’d-din came to Sindh and Kachhi, spreading their descendants throughout the country. Tradition holds that the tribal divisions originated in the performance of Jalal Khan’s funeral ceremonies.

Rind had been appointed successor to the Phagh or Royal Turban by his father and proposed to perform the ceremonies and erect an asrokh or memorial canopy. His brother and rival Hooth refused to join him, whereupon the others also refused; each performed the ceremony separately, and there were five asrokhs in Kech. Some of the Balochs joined one and some another, and so the five great tribes were formed.

It seems probable that there were five principal gatherings of clans under well-known leaders, and that they became known by some nickname or descriptive epithet, such as the Rinds (‘chess’), the Hooths (‘warriors‘), the Lasharis (‘men of Lashar‘), etc., and that these names were afterwards transferred to their ostensible ancestors. The Buledis, or men of Buleda 2 probably joined the confederacy later. The same may be said of the Ghazanis and Umaranis.

Offline rindolashar

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Re: Mir Jalal Khan
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2012, 09:21:53 AM »


Mir Jalal Khan's fort, Bampur, Balochistan